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Learn your plant's love-language.

Every plant is unique. Learn it's ideal light levels, watering cadence & specific care instructions to make your plant the happiest and healthiest it can be.

Lemon Butter Fern
Sun
  • Your fern prefers bright indirect light. Find a south-facing window or the brightest alternative.
  • A frosted window offers bright indirect light, perfect for ferns!
  • Rotate your fern to ensure all sides receive light.
  • Ferns love humidity. Be mindful of air vents and the proximity to fireplaces or other sources of airflow.
Water
  • Regular weekly watering is encouraged, and avoid drought conditions. Keep the soil moist but not soggy.
  • Remove your fern from its decorative pot, run water over its roots and then allow access water to drain out of the grower's pot before returning it to your decorative pot.
  • Ferns enjoy a regular misting!
Tips
  • Bring your fern off the floor or table by using a plant stand or a plant hanger, or by placing it on a tall surface, to encourage the sprawling, trailing foliage to flourish.
Story
  • "Fern Fever" became a craze in the Victorian era when the hobbyists took to growing ferns in hothouses bursting with humidity, the result? Ferns galore!
Fiddle Leaf Fig
Sun
  • This indoor tree prefers bright indirect light to reach its full potential. Find a south-facing window or the brightest alternative.
  • Avoid direct sun, as the leaves will burn.
  • Rotate your FLF regularly to allow all angles of your plant to receive sunlight. This will result in balanced and sturdy growth. (Pro tip! For large plants, place the base on a lazy Susan for easy spinning).
Water
  • Give your FLF a good soaking once a week, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.
  • For the best results, take it to a sink or shower, soak the entire plant and then allow all excess water to drain before returning to your decorative pot.
Tips
  • A misting or gentle wipe down of the leaves will keep your fig extra happy.
Story
  • The fiddle leaf fig is native to Western Africa, where it grows in tropical rainforests.
Monstera
Sun
  • Prefers bright indirect light. Place close to a south-facing window or in the next brightest alternative.
  • Avoid direct sun, as the leaves will burn.
  • Your Monstera loves humidity! Bright bathrooms or grouping it with other plants will boost humidity levels.
  • Try to posiiton your plant away from blowing air, such as an air vent or gas fireplace.
  • Consistent sunlight can provide shorter inter-leaf spacing and more character in the leaves.
Water
  • Water your Monstera every 10-14 days.
  • If possible, water the roots of your Monstera in the sink or shower, allowing access water to drain fully out of the grower's pot before placing it back in your decorartive pot.
  • Keep the soil on the dryer side, allowing the top layer of soil to dry out between waterings.
  • Don't allow your plant to sit in water. This will drown the roots and will make them susceptible to root rot.
Tips
  • Loosen your plants soil with a chopstick every few weeks, allowing water to reach the roots.
  • You may need support for your Monsteras' fast-growing foliage, you can do so by binding inner stems together or staking large stems with string.
Story
  • Native to Southern Mexico the Monstera Deliciosa was formerly known as Philodendron pertusum.
Anthurium
Sun
  • Prefers medium to bright indirect light. A mantle or bookcase close to a south-facing window works well.
  • Avoid direct sun, as the leaves and flowers will burn.
  • A bright spot will result in more blooms; a lower light environment will result in more foliage.
Water
  • Water your Anthurium 1-2 times per week, allowing the soil to dry slightly between waterings.
  • Take the grower's pot directly out of the decorative pot and then water it in the sink, allowing for full drainage.
  • Keep a watch on soil texture. A humid or dry environment can affect the frequency of waterings.
Tips
  • Cut back dead foliage and faded flowers.
  • Try placing a mirror close to your Anthurium to boost the brightness in a room. As a bonus, you'll also get a 360° view of your plant's beauty!
Story
  • The word Anthurium is derived from Greek and translates to "tall flower".
Philodendron
Sun
  • Philodendrons are easy-going plants. They prefer moderate to bright indirect light conditions. A mantle, tall bookcase, shelves, or any place that gets some natural sunlight and will allow for optimal trailing space.
  • Typically, climbing varieties of Philodendron can withstand lower light levels.
  • Avoid direct sun, as the leaves will scorch.
  • Variegation (pleasing, stripy patterns on the leaves) is more likely if your Philodendron is in a bright spot.
Water
  • Water every 10-14 days.
  • Philodendrons like their soil on the drier side. Find a pattern that suits the humidity levels in your space, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.
  • Mist leaves to loosen dust and allow the heart-shaped foliage to shine.
Tips
  • Propagate clippings of your philodendron by placing them in water. Once new roots have formed, plant the cuttings and share them with friends!.
  • If roots push through the drainage holes of your pot, it's a sign that a larger pot is necessary.
  • If stems are long and leggy, with several inches between the leaves, it may be a sign that your Philodendron requires more sunlight.
Story
  • Native to South America, Philodendrons are known to creep and crawl along the forest floor and climb up trees to find light. Their name translates to "tree loving".
Pilea
Sun
  • Prefers bright indirect light.
  • Pick a sunny, south-facing spot if available.
  • Avoid direct sunlight, as the leaves will burn. A bright but frosted window is a great spot for a Pilea, as it creates soft, bright light.
  • Your Pilea's leaves will reach for the sun, so rotate to allow for a balanced look or go rogue and let your Pilea run free.
Water
  • Water 1-2 times per week, attempting to keep the soil evenly moist.
  • Take your Pilea out of the decorative pot and then water in the grower's pot to allow excess water to drain fully.
  • If your leaves look droopy, water your Pilea. If your leaves look yellow, make sure the soil isn't too soggy.
  • From spring through summer, fertilize monthly.
Tips
  • Pileas are great plants to share! Place your pups in water to root then plant in fresh soil and voila, more Pileas!
Story
  • The Pilea was originally coined the "missionary plant" because it was first discovered in 1946 in a Chinese mountain range by a Norwegian missionary.
Pothos
Sun
  • Can happily survive in low to bright light conditions.
  • Variegation (the stripy graphic pattern), is more likely if your Pothos is situated in a bright spot.
  • Avoid direct sunlight, as the leaves will scorch.
Water
  • Pothos like their soil on the drier side. Watering once every 2-3 weeks is a good baseline.
  • Allow the top layer of soil to dry out between waterings.
  • From spring through summer, fertilize monthly.
Tips
  • Prune back your Pothos twice a year. This encourages sturdier growth and gives you clippings to propagate.
  • If roots are bursting through the drainage holes of your pot, it's a sign that a larger pot is necessary.
Story
  • The Pothos is a tropical vine that originates from French Polynesia, where it trails from tall trees and grazes the forest floor. It's often confused with the Philodendron. The key differences are the Pothos' ability to feature gold, white and yellow variegation and their larger leaf size.
Rubber Tree
Sun
  • Prefers bright to moderate indirect light. Place your rubber tree close to a south-facing window or your brightest alternative.
  • Avoid direct sun, as the leaves will scorch.
  • Rubber tree's enjoy humidity!
Water
  • Water your rubber tree 1-2 times per week depending on the humidity.
  • Keep the soil moist but not soggy. During the cooler months, it's okay to allow the soil to dry out slightly. If overwatered, leaves may turn yellow and fall off.
  • Avoid misting as the rubber tree's leaves can capture static water, which can lead to spot disease.
Tips
  • Once you find a good spot for your rubber tree, leave it! They are known to be sensitive to fluctuating temperature changes.
  • For a controlled, compact look, clip back any unruly growth and keep your rubber tree in its grower's pot, which will bound the roots and control the growth.
  • For a more wild and tall vibe, re-pot your rubber tree as it matures, adding support streaks to large stocks.
Story
  • Native to India, the white sap of a rubber tree, when dry, creates a natural rubber texture and is the reason for its namesake.
Snake Plant
Sun
  • Snake plants can tolerate variable light conditions, from bright direct light to low, even artificial, light sources. In other words, put this plant anywhere!
  • The more sun exposure you provide, the more sword-like growth you'll experience
Water
  • Water every 2-4 weeks, allowing the soil to completely dry out between waterings.
  • If possible, place your snake plant in the sink, allowing the base of your plant to receive water first.
  • Wipe leaves with a damp cloth for added shine.
  • If soil becomes too hard, loosen with chopsticks or re-pot with fresh soil.
  • From spring through fall, fertilize monthly.
Tips
  • The foliage of your sturdy snake plant grows vertically. Look to utilize its height as a partition infront of a window or to hide anything unsightly.
  • Snake plants can reach over a metre tall. Look to re-pot when your grower's pot is bursting with roots.
  • In need of some fresh air? An excellent air-purifying plant, the snake plant works the day shift and the night shift, absorbing toxins and releasing oxygen 24-7.
Story
  • The snake plant is known to bring good fortune and in many African rituals is thought to resolve conflict and deflect the evil eye.
ZZ Plant
Sun
  • Prefers low to moderate light conditions. Your ZZ plant can happily live 2-3 metres away from windows.
  • Avoid direct sunlight as your plant will burn.
  • Wipe your ZZ foliage with a damp cloth, making it shine and enabling it to capture all available light.
Water
  • Try to keep your plant's soil slightly moist. Virtually "unkillable" your easy ZZ will forgive you if you put it through some drought conditions. (ZZ plants have reservoirs for storing water and can draw from these when needed!)
  • Overwatering can cause stem and root rot. Look for yellowing leaves as an indicator.
Tips
  • The ZZ is known for its draping, tuberous arches. As these grow, ensure your pot is heavy to avoid toppling.
  • A slow-growing beauty, this plant requires patience, but you'll be able to enjoy it for years and years to come.
Story
  • Native to Eastern Africa, spanning from Kenya south to northeastern South Africa.
Blue Star Fern

Details coming soon!

Montgomery Ivy

Details coming soon!

Pickle Plant

Details coming soon!

Peperomia Caperata

Details coming soon!

Jade

Details coming soon!

Rex Begonia

Details coming soon!

Cactus

Details coming soon!

“We may think we are nurturing our garden, but of course it’s our garden that is really nurturing us.”

Jenny Uglow